Cold, Cough & Congestion

Standard

I’ve been fighting the nasty flu for the last 5 days…. with a pinch of fever and a dash of body aches. Oh how I hate the cold… and being ill.

I thought it would be wise to read up on the nasty flu/cold, to help my now sick girlfriend. Merry christmas, I brought you the flu.


The Common Cold

How do you know when you have a common head cold as opposed to a flu virus? Common cold symptoms are less serious than flu symptoms and they usually come on more slowly. You can expect a common cold to last as long as 10 days. Symptoms usually start two to three days after exposure to a cold virus — the incubation period.

There is no cure for the common cold because viruses, unlike bacteria, do not respond to antibiotics. And unlike the flu, common colds can’t be prevented because they are caused by more than 200 different viruses. So if you have a headache and other symptoms due to a common cold, all you can do is take care of yourself and wait it out.

Are There Different Types of Colds?

Head colds and chest colds are the two main types of colds, but they are caused by the same type of virus. If a cold goes down into your chest, you will probably notice a cough along with your stuffy head, headache, nasal congestion, and other symptoms. Having frequent colds does not mean you are getting different types of colds, but that you are getting exposed to different cold viruses. Summer colds are less frequent than winter colds, but they are not different types of colds.

Cold Remedies for Headache and Other Symptoms

There is no remedy that can make your cold go away any faster, but there are things you can do to relieve some of the symptoms, especially when you need a clear head at work:

  • Add moisture. Moistening your upper airway can help loosen secretions and can relieve pressure and congestion. You can do this with saline nasal drops, a humidifier, or by taking a hot, steamy shower. Drinking plenty of fluids helps keep your mucous thin and moving.
  • Over-the-counter pain relievers. Acetaminophen (Tylenol) will help alleviate headache, sore throat, and fever. Make sure not to use aspirin as a pain reliever for kids, as it could lead to a dangerous condition known as Reye’s syndrome.
  • Decongestant nasal sprays. These sprays will open up your nasal passages but must be used with caution, because they can cause a rebound effect that makes your nose even stuffier than before. Don’t use these sprays for children unless you check with your doctor first.
  • Cough and cold preparations. These over-the-counter medicines may combine decongestants, cough suppressants, mucous thinners, and pain relievers. They are mostly safe for adults, but carefully read the side effects. Those that contain antihistamines can make you drowsy and should not be used at work if you need to be alert. These medications are not recommended for children.

Headaches From Other Causes

If over-the-counter medications don’t help and your headaches persist, it’s time to consider other possible causes. One possibility is a sinus infection. With a sinus infection, pain is usually localized over one or more of the sinus areas in the forehead, around the eyes, and over the upper teeth. Sinus pain may get worse with movement. “A cold typically lasts for less than five days and is due to a virus,” says Jordan S. Josephson, MD, a sinus specialist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. “Secretions from a cold usually clear over time and do not need to be treated with an antibiotic. However, if your cold lasts more than seven days or you have increasing fever or pain, consider seeing your doctor to make sure you have not developed a sinus infection. If the mucous turns yellow or green, then an antibiotic may be needed.”

http://www.everydayhealth.com/cold-and-flu/headaches-and-head-colds.aspx


7 Natural Cough Remedies for Persistent & Dry Coughs

There are two primary types of coughs, dry and productive. A productive cough is one in which you are coughing up phlegm or mucous-this is not a cough that should be suppressed, as your body needs to rid itself of the gunk that’s in your chest/lungs. While it shouldn’t be suppressed, some of these remedies will address a productive cough by including an expectorant, or something that loosens mucous and makes it easier for the body to get rid of.

A dry, hacking, cough is another story. This is one we do want to stop. It can be caused byallergies, dry air, a random tickle at the back of your throat that won’t go away, the aftermath of a cold, being in a dusty environment, etc. etc. For these we turn to demulcents, ingredients that soothe irritated mucous membranes and remove the irritant triggering the cough. Studies conducted in 2004 found that the main ingredients in cough syrup (dextromethorphan and diphenhydramine) have the same effectiveness in treating coughs as a placebo ingredient. Instead of turning to chemical solutions for every minor ailment, try some home remedies instead. They are not only better for you, but they taste a whole lot better than most cough syrup too!

1. A Spoonful of Honey

Studies, such as one conducted at Penn State College of Medicine, have found that honey can work more efficiently to calm a cough than over-the-counter drugs. It is a rich demulcent, with a high viscosity and stickiness that does an incredible job of coating and soothing those irritated mucous membranes. Thanks to an enzyme added by bees when they harvest honey, it also hasantibacterial properties as well, which may help shorten how long you have the cough if it is due to bacterial illness.

Note: This is an excellent alternative remedy for both kids and adults, but should never be given to children under the age of 2 years due to the risk of botulism.

You will need…

-1 tablespoon of organic, raw, honey

Directions

Take 1 tablespoon of honey 1-3 times daily as needed to control coughing. Take immediately before bed if cough is disrupting your sleep. For children, you can adjust the dosing to 1 teaspoon up to one tablespoon.

2. Licorice Root Tea

Licorice root is both an expectorant and demulcent, simultaneously soothing your airways while loosening and thinning mucous, easing congestion. It can also ease any inflammation that may be irritating your throat. Its main constituent, glycyrrhizin, is responsible for most of its effects. 30-50 times sweeter than sucrose (table sugar), it inhibits an enzyme 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (how would like you to write that on a name tag?) This enzyme regulates access of glucocorticoid (a steroid hormone) to steroid receptors, ultimately slowing the conversion of cortisol to cortisone. This increases the effect of cortisol and reducing inflammation. If you are on steroids, or have any problems with your kidneys, it is best to steer clear of licorice root.

You will need…

-2 tablespoons of dried licorice root
-8 ounces of fresh water

Directions

Bring water to a boil and place the licorice root in a mug. Cover with water and steep for 10-15 minutes. Drink the entire cup up to 2 times daily.

3. Gargle Salt Water

Also a popular remedy for sore throats, salt water can ease the discomfort caused by a cough the same way it helps a sore throat-through osmosis. When the concentration of salt is higher outside of the cells in your mucous membranes, water flows out of the cells to balance everything out. When water leaves the cells, swelling goes down, and discomfort is decreased. If you have a cough that happens to come along with inflamed tissue, this is a good route to take. It can also help dislodge any phlegm that’s hanging out and allow you to expel it easily.

You will need…

-1 teaspoon of salt
-8 ounces of warm water

Directions

Stir salt into water until it is thoroughly dissolved. Gargle for 15 seconds, spit, and repeat with the remaining water. Rinse with plain water afterwards.

4. Steam, Steam, Steam!

I can’t say how underrated steam is when it comes to anything dealing with a cough, cold, or congestion. Not only does the steam quite literally loosen mucous and phlegm, almost immediately, but you can add numerous essential oils that will impart wonderful healing benefits. These benefits (anti-viral, anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory etc.) do become airborne, so you inhale them while you breathe in the steam. For this particular blend I’ve included both tea tree oil and eucalyptus oil, which can help soothe and open your airways as well as help fight off bacteria or a virus.

You will need…

-3 drops of tea tree oil
-1-2 drops of eucalyptus oil
-A bowl of water
-A soft, clean, towel

Directions

Bring enough water to a boil to halfway fill a medium size-heat proof bowl. Pour the water into it, let it cool slightly for 30-60 seconds, and add the essential oils, giving it a quick stir to release the vapors. Lean over the bowl and get as close as you can while still being comfortable. Remember that steam can seriously burn! Use the towel to cover your head like a tent, trapping the steam, and breathe deeply. Ideally, do this for 5-10 minutes 2-3 times a day.

5. Tea Thyme

Thyme has been used for centuries, and was even used during one of the most devastating pandemics to take place in human history. The Black Death was a plague that peaked in Europe from 1346-1353. During that time, and in other incidents of the plague thereafter, townspeople would gather to burn large bundles of thyme to ward off the disease, or carry pockets of thyme on them. Indeed, thyme does have anti-microbial properties, but we’re not warding off any plague here-just your cough. Thyme relaxes the muscles of the trachea and bronchi, and also opens up airways. The result is less coughing, and increased comfort.

You will need…

-a handful of fresh thyme sprigs OR 2 tablespoons dried thyme
-8 ounces of fresh water
-Honey or lemon (optional)

Directions

Lightly bruise the thyme, e.g. with a mortar and pestle, and then place in a mug. Cover with 8 ounces of boiling water, cover, and let it steep for 10-15 minutes. Add some lemon or honey to taste, and drink the whole thing. Repeat 2-3 times daily as needed. It’s absolutely delightful just before bedtime (unless you aren’t a fan of thyme. But drink some anyways.)

6. Pepper & Honey

Black pepper is the world’s most traded spice, but most of its use is limited to the culinary world. What people don’t know is that it can make a great remedy for coughs that are accompanied by a lot of mucous or chest congestion. If you’ve accidently leaned too close to black pepper while it’s being grinded, you know it can make you cough or tickle your nose. This may not be fun on a regular basis, but it’s a plus if you need to expel all the nasty stuff that’s gunking up your lungs. The honey adds its antibacterial properties, and it makes it so the pepper isn’t too irritating. You can make black pepper “syrup” with honey, or a tea, as below. If possible, use freshly ground black pepper, as the pre-ground pepper simply seems to lose some of its punch.

You will need…

-1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
-1 tablespoon of honey
-8 ounces of fresh water

Directions

Place the pepper and honey in a mug and then cover with boiling water. Give it stir to disperse the pepper flakes and melt in the honey. Steep for 10 minutes, stir once more, and drink in its entirety. Repeat 1-2 times a day as needed to loosen mucous.

7. Ginger Peppermint Syrup

Here you get the soothing qualities of warming ginger, all wrapped up in a delicious easy to swallow cough syrup. Spicy ginger works as an expectorant, helping loosen and expel mucous from the lungs. It can also stop the painful tickle at the back of throat that can trigger a cough if the first place, if you are experiencing a dry cough. The peppermint will also help relieve the irritating tickle of a cough.

You will need…

-3 tablespoons of chopped ginger
-1 tablespoon of dried peppermint
-4 cups of water
-1 cup of honey

Directions

Chop the ginger and add it along with the peppermint to 4 cups of water. Bring to a boil and then lower the heat so that the liquid simmer. Simmer until the liquid has been reduced by half, than strain. Let it cool slightly, and then stir in 1 cup of honey until it has been dissolved completely. Bottle and take 1 tablespoon every few hours as needed to ease your cough. Keep refrigerated for up to 3 weeks.

Tips:

-I cannot stress the importance of covering your tea while it steeps. Not only does it keep it piping hot, it traps all the steam and any of the volatile oils in the steam (and their benefits) in the cup for you to inhale when you uncover it.

http://everydayroots.com/cough-remedies

Advertisements

Weston A. Price – Restoring nutrient-dense foods to the human diet

Standard

Characteristics of Traditional Diets

  1. The diets of healthy primitive and nonindustrialized peoples contain no refined or denatured foods such as refined sugar or corn syrup; white flour; canned foods; pasteurized, homogenized, skim or low-fat milk; refined or hydrogenated vegetable oils; protein powders; artificial vitamins or toxic additives and colorings.
  2. All traditional cultures consume some sort of animal protein and fat from fish and other seafood; water and land fowl; land animals; eggs; milk and milk products; reptiles; and insects.
  3. Primitive diets contain at least four times the calcium and other minerals and TEN times the fat soluble vitamins from animal fats (vitamin A, vitamin D and the Price Factor–now believed to be vitamin K2) as the average American diet.
  4. In all traditional cultures, some animal products are eaten raw.
  5. Primitive and traditional diets have a high food-enzyme content from raw dairy products, raw meat and fish; raw honey; tropical fruits; cold-pressed oils; wine and unpasteurized beer; and naturally preserved, lacto-fermented vegetables, fruits, beverages, meats and condiments.
  6. Seeds, grains and nuts are soaked, sprouted, fermented or naturally leavened in order to neutralize naturally occuring antinutrients in these foods, such as phytic acid, enzyme inhibitors, tannins and complex carbohydrates.
  7. Total fat content of traditional diets varies from 30% to 80% but only about 4% of calories come from polyunsaturated oils naturally occurring in grains, pulses, nuts, fish, animal fats and vegetables. The balance of fat calories is in the form of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids.
  8. Traditional diets contain nearly equal amounts of omega-6 and omega-3 essential fatty acids.
  9. All primitive diets contain some salt.
  10. Traditional cultures consume animal bones, usually in the form of gelatin-rich bone broths.
  11. Traditional cultures make provisions for the health of future generations by providing special nutrient-rich foods for parents-to-be, pregnant women and growing children; by proper spacing of children; and by teaching the principles of right diet to the young.

Dietary Guidelines

  1. Eat whole, natural foods.
  2. Eat only foods that will spoil, but eat them before they do.
  3. Eat naturally-raised meat including fish, seafood, poultry, beef, lamb, game, organ meats and eggs.
  4. Eat whole, naturally-produced milk products from pasture-fed cows, preferably raw and/or fermented, such as whole yogurt, cultured butter, whole cheeses and fresh and sour cream.
  5. Use only traditional fats and oils including butter and other animal fats, extra virgin olive oil, expeller expressed sesame and flax oil and the tropical oils—coconut and palm.
  6. Eat fresh fruits and vegetables, preferably organic, in salads and soups, or lightly steamed.
  7. Use whole grains and nuts that have been prepared by soaking, sprouting or sour leavening to neutralize phytic acid and other anti-nutrients.
  8. Include enzyme-enhanced lacto-fermented vegetables, fruits, beverages and condiments in your diet on a regular basis.
  9. Prepare homemade meat stocks from the bones of chicken, beef, lamb or fish and use liberally in soups and sauces.
  10. Use herb teas and coffee substitutes in moderation.
  11. Use filtered water for cooking and drinking.
  12. Use unrefined Celtic sea salt and a variety of herbs and spices for food interest and appetite stimulation.
  13. Make your own salad dressing using raw vinegar, extra virgin olive oil and expeller expressed flax oil.
  14. Use natural sweeteners in moderation, such as raw honey, maple syrup, dehydrated cane sugar juice and stevia powder.
  15. Use only unpasteurized wine or beer in strict moderation with meals.
  16. Cook only in stainless steel, cast iron, glass or good quality enamel.
  17. Use only natural supplements.
  18. Get plenty of sleep, exercise and natural light.
  19. Think positive thoughts and minimize stress.
  20. Practice forgiveness.

Dietary Dangers

  1. Don’t eat commercially processed foods such as cookies, cakes, crackers, TV dinners, soft drinks, packaged sauce mixes, etc.
  2. Avoid all refined sweeteners such as sugar, dextrose, glucose and high fructose corn syrup.
  3. Avoid white flour, white flour products and white rice.
  4. Avoid all hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated fats and oils.
  5. Avoid all vegetable oils made from soy, corn, safflower, canola or cottonseed.
  6. Do not use polyunsaturated oils for cooking, sauteing or baking.
  7. Avoid fried foods.
  8. Do not practice veganism; animal products provide vital nutrients not found in plant foods.
  9. Avoid products containing protein powders.
  10. Avoid pasteurized milk; do not consume lowfat milk, skim milk, powdered milk or imitation milk products.
  11. Avoid battery-produced eggs and factory-farmed meats.
  12. Avoid highly processed luncheon meats and sausage containing MSG and other additives.
  13. Avoid rancid and improperly prepared seeds, nuts and grains found in granolas, quick rise breads and extruded breakfast cereals, as they block mineral absorption and cause intestinal distress.
  14. Avoid canned, sprayed, waxed, bioengineered or irradiated fruits and vegetables.
  15. Avoid artificial food additives, especially MSG, hydrolyzed vegetable protein and aspartame, which are neurotoxins. Most soups, sauce and broth mixes and commercial condiments contain MSG, even if not so labeled.
  16. Avoid caffeine-containing beverages such as coffee, tea and soft drinks. Avoid chocolate.
  17. Avoid aluminum-containing foods such as commercial salt, baking powder and antacids. Do not use aluminum cookware or aluminum-containing deodorants.
  18. Do not drink fluoridated water.
  19. Avoid synthetic vitamins and foods containing them.
  20. Do not drink distilled liquors.
  21. Do not use a microwave oven.

http://www.westonaprice.org/health-topics/abcs-of-nutrition/dietary-guidelines/

Beef Bars?

Standard

Epic Barsepic

My acupuncturist told me about these protein bars….

The EPIC bar is a 100% grass fed animal based protein bar designed as nature intended. Paleo friendly, gluten free, and low in sugar, we believe that EPIC foods should inspire EPIC health.

epic1dsc_0226https://epicbar.com


Tanka Bars

2c9b21ada2a4fd8c1ae86056ecfec15e

GLUTEN-FREE * NITRATES-FREE * MSG-FREE * HORMONE-FREE

Made from tart-sweet cranberries and prairie-raised buffalo, the Tanka Bar is a delicious real food bar with a smoky, slightly-sweet flavor.

100% Natural and only 70-calories, Tanka Bars are the perfect food for anyone who’s on the go — athletes, outdoor enthusiasts, students, busy moms, and pow-wow dancers. Gluten-free, hormone-free and low-fat, the Tanka Bars are deliciously perfect for every diet lifestyle. Tanka Bars are guaranteed shelf-stable for up to 12 months.

There are three delicious flavors to choose from:

  • APPLE ORANGE PEEL
  • SLOW SMOKED ORIGINAL
  • SPICY PEPPER

a1539a58719bab470c29ee915d4005e6 4aa995e9e84bdb886a37d0ef4a2f046b

http://www.tankabar.com

Sea Vegetables

Standard

SEA VEGGIES

If you thought vegetables only grew in soil on land, you’re deliciously mistaken. Simple to cook and serve in your favorite dishes, sea vegetables are plentiful and full of flavor. They’re also the pearls of the vegetable family and can add depth to just about anything in your cooking repertoire.

Although sea vegetables are underappreciated in American culture, they’ve long been a staple in Asian cuisines and consumed for hundreds of years in the British Isles, Canada and the Caribbean as well. As tasty proof, try Dashi.

Think you’ve never eaten a sea vegetable before? Think again. Food manufacturers often use processed sea vegetables as thickeners or stabilizers in all types of common products, from instant pudding to toothpaste. (Agar agar is commonly used this way.)

Sea veggies are also chockfull of chlorophyll and dietary fiber and they lend a salty flavor to foods which comes from a balanced combination of sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, iron and many other trace minerals naturally found in the ocean.

A Sea Vegetable Primer

Agar Agar

Also called kanten or Japanese gelatin, it’s a clear, tasteless alternative to animal or chemical-based gelatin and comes in opaque flakes. Agar agar is actually a combination of various sea veggies and just like any other gelatin, it can be used to firm up jellies, pies and puddings. It simply dissolves in hot liquid and thickens at room temperature. (This Chocolate Mocha Pie is thickened with agar agar.)

Arame

Look for thin and wiry black shreds. They have a sweet, mild flavor and pack in a good supply of calcium, iodine, potassium, vitamin A and dietary fiber. Rinse thoroughly, then soak in warm water for 10 to 15 minutes before cooking. Try them in quiches, omelets, stir-fries, pasta salad or tossed into a cold salad with a light vinaigrette. Here’s a delicious example of just how good arame really is: Savory Vegetable-Arame Quiche.

Dulse

This sea vegetable isn’t green at all. It’s reddish brown, full of potassium and protein and available in whole stringy leaves or powdered as a condiment. Expect a chewy texture and slightly salty finish. Pan-fried in sesame oil, dulse becomes feather-light and crispy and can lend a savory flavor and crunch to any sandwich or salad. Some even liken it to bacon! In fact, you can eat this one straight from the package like jerky. Try this East-Meets-Southwest Chicken Tostada Salad topped with dulse.

Kombu

Its dark purple color might just romance you. Look for kombu in thick strips or sheets. Eating it adds iodine, calcium, magnesium and iron to your diet — easily added dry to the cooking liquid for rice, beans or soup. There’s an extra advantage to kombu, too: cooking a postage stamp-sized piece of dried kombu with beans will help make them more digestible. Cooking hint: Keep in mind that kombu doubles its volume and readily soaks up water, so add extra liquid to broths, beans and stocks whenever you add dried kombu.

Nori

This just might be the sea vegetable you know best since it’s typically used to make sushi rolls like California Rolls. Look for nori to be dark purple to marine green. It’s readily available toasted or untoasted, too. Eat up; it contains both iodine and vitamin C so don’t hesitate to use it as a condiment for rice, soups, salads, casseroles or grains either crushed into flakes or cut into strips.

Sea Palm

Its name gives away the fact that this sea vegetable, brownish-green in color, looks just like a miniature palm tree. It’s also called American arame and comes from America’s pacific coast. Expect a sweet, salty taste with this one, so enjoy it raw or sautéed, added to soups or salads or toast some and add to your trail mix. Try this: marinate sea palm and other sea vegetables in a mirin-tamari-ginger juice sauce for an out-of-this-world sea vegetable salad.

Wakame

Pronounced wah-ka-may, this deep grayish-green sea vegetable is the tenderest of them all. Consider adding it to your diet since it supplies dietary fiber and potassium. After soaking it for about 10 minutes in water, wakame expands to seven times its original size. After being soaked then cooked, long fronds of wakame become silky and almost melt in your mouth. Eat raw as a snack, add to soups and stir fries or roast and sprinkle on salads or stews as an easy way to add minerals to your favorite foods. (Try this Wakame, Mushroom and Broccoli Sauté.)

Sea Vegetable Q & A

Most sea vegetables that I see on the shelves at the grocery are dried. Do I have to soak them in water before using them?
Sometimes yes, sometimes no. Available in dried form year-round, most sea vegetables (except dulse and nori) are rehydrated before adding to salads, casseroles, quiches or stir-fries. Dried sea vegetables can be added directly to soups or stews and to the cooking liquid of beans or rice.

I’d love to work sea vegetables into my meals, but where do I start?
Try them already combined with tempeh, in pre-mixed miso soup packages, as a garnish in flake or powder form, or in prepared foods.

I’m a little wary of sea vegetables because I’ve heard they taste fishy. Is that just a bunch of bunk?
Don’t believe everything you hear. They are from the sea, but they’re not particularly fishy in flavor. Start with the sweet, mild flavors of arame and wakame first and we think they’ll win you over.

http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/recipes/food-guides/sea-veggies

Low Down on Sweeteners

Standard

We’re Naturally Sweet, Thanks

Looking for alternatives to refined sugars? You’ve come to the right place. There’s a whole host of sweet delights on our shelves, waiting to liven up your cup of coffee, baked goods, marinades and dressings. Think refined sugars are your only choice? Think again.

Natural sweeteners like unrefined brown sugar, maple syrup, molasses, barley malt and rice syrups, honey and agave nectar are common these days and for good reason. Each has a unique flavor and set of uses that’ll satisfy any craving for sweetness in everything from your salad dressings to your roasted pork loin. Want to know which natural sweeteners are the best choice for you? Keep reading.

Sugar on Top

These days, the main sources of commercial sugar are sugar cane and sugar beets, from which a variety of sugar products are made:

Granulated white sugar is common, highly-refined all-purpose sugar. Look for organic, unbleached varieties for a tastier, more natural choice.

Confectioners’ sugar (a.k.a. powdered sugar) is granulated white sugar that’s been crushed to a fine powder. That may sound painful, but it’s perfect for icings and decorations.

Unrefined brown sugar (a.k.a. raw sugar) is slightly purified, crystallized evaporated cane juice. This distinctive, caramel-flavored sugar comes in a variety of flavors including demerara, dark muscovado and turbinado.

Unrefined dehydrated cane juice is generally made by extracting and then dehydrating cane juice, with minimal loss of original flavor, color, or nutrients. (Unsure about how to use cane juice? Try a chocolate almond dream smoothie.)

The Buzz on Honey

It’s no small feat to be the world’s oldest-known unrefined sweetener. Because honey’s flavor and color are derived from the flower nectar collected by bees, honey has lots of pride of place. This accounts for the wide range of honeys available around the world. Note that dark honeys generally have a stronger flavor than lighter ones.

Since bees can forage up to a mile from their hive and are indiscriminate in their nectar choices, when a particular flower is named on the label of a honey container, it simply means that flower was the predominant one in bloom in the harvest area.

Here are a few of the most buzz-worthy varieties:

  • Clover: mild flavored and readily available in colors ranging from water white to light amber
  • Wildflower: generally dark with a range of flavors and aromas depending on the flowers that provided the nectar
  • Alfalfa: light in color with a delicate flavor
  • Orange Blossom: a distinctive citrus flavor and aroma and light in color
  • Blueberry: slightly dark with a robust, full flavor
  • Tupelo: fragrant, light and mild
  • Chestnut: dark, tangy and slightly bitter with a high mineral content

Storage tip: Keep honey in an airtight container and, if used infrequently, at temperatures below 50°F. Liquid honey will eventually crystallize but can be returned easily to a liquid state by placing the container in warm water for a few minutes.

Health note: Honey should not be fed to children less than one year old because it can contain spores of Clostridium botulinum, the bacteria that causes botulism.

Continue reading