Activated Charcoal

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What is It, How It Works, and What It is Used For

You make activated charcoal by burning a source of carbon such as wood, debris, or better yet, coconut shells. The high temperature removes all the oxygen and activates it with gases like steam. What is produced is a highly adsorbent material with millions of tiny pores that capture, bind, and remove poisons, heavy metals, chemicals, and intestinal gases which have thousands of times more weight than the charcoal itself. The porous surface has a negative electric charge that attracts positively charged unwanted toxins and gas. Toxicology studies show activated charcoal to be harmless to human health.

  • General detoxification – Toxins from low quality, processed food, and environmental pollution are real problems. It is important to help your body eliminate them to promote a healthy digestive system and brain. Chronic exposure to toxins produces cellular damage, allergic reactions, compromised immunity, and more rapid aging. Regular use of activated charcoal can remove unwanted toxins from your body, leaving you feeling renewed and more vibrant, often in minutes! Gut toxins quickly become brain toxins if you don’t eliminate them. Whether or not you are feeling under the weather, activated charcoal helps unwanted bacteria move through your system faster before they spread and multiply, helping you feel better faster.
  • Relieve digestive issues, gas, and bloating – After digesting foods like beans, the decomposition process from bacteria in your body creates byproducts like gas or diarrhea. Activated charcoal enters the digestive tract and counteracts this process by binding to byproducts and alleviating these digestive issues.
  • Antidote for drugs, chemicals, and poisons – Charcoal is an age-old remedy for counteracting poison in the body. If you ingest poisons such as bleach, fertilizer, or even alcohol, taking a single large dose of activated charcoal helps your body flush out the poison faster. Activated charcoal adsorbs most organic chemicals, many inorganic chemicals, drugs, pesticides, mercury, and even lead, before they harm your body. If you’re poisoned, go to the emergency room! But, there’s no reason you shouldn’t start binding a poison right away.
  • Rid bad breath, body odor, and skin ailments – Activated charcoal is often used in body detox products and skin products that help relieve insect stings, mushroom poisoning, poison ivy, cholera, bites, and inflammation. Body odor and bad breath is usually a result of toxins leaving the body, which is why taking activated charcoal greatly helps rid bad breath and body odor.
  • Anti-Aging properties – Studies show activated charcoal prevents many cellular changes associated with aging, adrenal gland, and kidney function. Famous Gerontologists discovered its powerful anti-aging properties in a study showing activated charcoal to increase the average lifespan of older test animals by approximately 34 percent. Activated charcoal slows the rate at which the brain becomes increasingly sensitive to toxins as you age, which makes for better cognitive functioning. It also builds a better defense mechanism by improving the adaptive functioning of essential organs like the liver, kidneys, and adrenals.
  • Better heart health – Activated charcoal helps lower the amount of total lipids, cholesterol, and triglycerides in your blood, liver, heart, and brain. In a study where patients with high cholesterol took grams of activated charcoal, three times a day, patients showed a 25% reduction in total cholesterol and doubled their HDL/LDL cholesterol ratio Studies examining microscopic tissues show a daily dose of activated charcoal helps prevent abnormal hardening (sclerosis) in heart and coronary blood vessels.

How to Use It to Detox Your Body and Feel Noticeably Better

Because activated coconut charcoal is mainly used to remove toxins from the body, it is great to use for the following purposes:

  • Take it when you eat out at restaurants or eat low quality foods like processed junk foods
  • Take it with bad coffee – it won’t fix the problem, but it helps
  • It is particularly helpful to take when drinking alcohol
  • Take it if you suddenly feel moody or tired
  • Opening a capsule on your toothbrush does amazing things for stained teeth
  • Use during pregnancy to bind toxins
  • Helpful for jet lag

Taking activated coconut charcoal on a daily basis is a great way to help you thrive in an overly toxin-filled environment. It is best to take it between meals and a few hours after using any vitamin or mineral supplements, as it may interfere with the absorption of these into your body. Be sure to take it away from prescription, which won’t enter your body when they bind to charcoal.

https://www.bulletproofexec.com/the-strangest-way-to-detox/

Flaxseed & Flaxseed Oil

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First, flax is a great source of fiber. Most Americans do not get enough fiber in their diet. Each tablespoon of flax contains about 8 grams of fiber. This helps keep the bowels regular. Because of all the fiber, be sure to start slow (say, with a half-teaspoon) and build up. Otherwise, you may experience bloating.

Second, flax is a plant source of omega-3. Once again, most Americans are short on their omega-3 fatty acids. These essential fatty acids (“essential” meaning they must be consumed because our bodies don’t make them) play an important role in the anti-inflammatory system of our body. Flax contains the shorter chain omega-3 called ALA (alpha-linolenic acid). Thus, it is not a replacement for fish or fish oil supplements that contain DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) and EPA (ecosapentaenoic acid.)

Third, flax contains lignans which reduce the risk of breast cancer in women and prostate cancer in men. The lignans alter the way your body metabolizes estrogens into safer forms.

As if this wasn’t enough, flax  has been shown to reduce hot flashes in menopausal women. To reap the benefits, this requires a daily dose of 2 tablespoons. And flax can normalize the menstrual cycle by supporting the second phase (the luteal phase).

Safety: Other than the bloating that may occur in a new user, flax is very safe. It’s a food that has been with us for thousands of years.

How to: Start slow and build up. Remember to grind it. (It is useful to get a coffee grinder for this purpose. Preground flax spoils, or oxidizes, quickly. Unground, the impermeable coating may make it pass right through you, and you won’t absorb any of the benefits.) Add it to cooked oatmeal, to pancake batter, or to yogurt. It has a nice nutty flavor. Don’t buy the oil as that eliminates the fiber and most of the lignans.

http://www.doctoroz.com/blog/victoria-maizes-md/benefits-flax


A rich source of healing compounds, flaxseed (also called linseed) has been cultivated for more than 7000 years. First cultivated in Europe, the plant’s brown seeds were regularly used to prepare balms for inflamed skin and healing slurries for constipation. Rich in essential fatty acids, or EFAs, flaxseed oil is used to prevent and treat heart disease and to relieve a variety of inflammatory disorders and hormone-related problems, including infertility.

The essential fatty acids (Omega oils)in flaxseed oil are one of its key healing components. EFAs are particularly valuable because the body needs them to function properly, but can’t manufacture them on its own. Essential fatty acids work throughout the body to protect cell membranes, keeping them efficient at admitting healthy substances while barring damaging ones.

One of the EFAs in flaxseed oil, alpha-linolenic acid, is known as an omega-3 fatty acid. Like the omega-3s found in fish, it appears to reduce the risk of heart disease and numerous other ailments.

Flaxseed oil is an excellent source of omega-3s: Just 1 teaspoon contains about 2.5 grams, equivalent to more than twice the amount most people get through their diets. Flaxseeds also contain omega-6 fatty acids in the form of linoleic acid; omega-6s are the same healthy fats found in vegetable oils.

Flaxseed oil only contains these alpha-linolenic acid (Omega 3 oils), and not the fiber or lignan components that the whole plant contains. Therefore, flaxseed oil provides the Omega 3 benefits, such as lipid-lowering properties, but not the laxative or anti-cancer properties.

Whole flaxseeds (not the extracted oil) are a rich source of lignans (phytoestrogens), substances that appear to positively affect hormone-related problems. Lignans may also be useful in preventing certain cancers and combating specific bacteria, fungi, and viruses, including those that cause cold sores and shingles.

Flaxseed may help to:

Lower cholesterol, protect against heart disease and control high blood pressure:

Several studies indicate that flaxseed oil, as well as ground flaxseeds, can lower cholesterol, thereby significantly reducing the risk of heart disease. Taking flaxseed oil may also protect against angina (chest pain) and high blood pressure. In addition, a five-year study done recently at Boston’s Simmons College found that flaxseed oil may be useful in preventing a second heart attack. It may also help prevent elevated blood pressure by inhibiting inflammatory reactions that cause artery-hardening plaque and poor circulation.

Counter inflammation associated with gout, lupus and fibrocystic breasts:

Omega-3 fatty acids appear to limit the inflammatory reaction associated with these conditions. In cases of lupus, flaxseed oil not only reduces inflammation in the joints, skin and kidneys, but also lowers cholesterol levels that may be elevated by the disease. Taking flaxseed oil for gout may lessen the often sudden and severe joint pain or swelling that is a symptom of this condition. In addition, the ability of omega-3 fatty acids to boost the absorption of iodine (a mineral often found in low levels in women suffering from fibrocystic breasts) makes flaxseed oil potentially valuable for treating this often painful condition.

Control constipation, hemorrhoids, diverticular disorders and gallstones:

As they are high in dietary fibre, ground flaxseeds can help ease the passage of stools and thus relieve constipation, hemorrhoids and diverticular disease. In those with diverticular disease, flaxseeds may also keep intestinal pouches free of waste and thus keep potential infection at bay. Taken for inflammatory bowel disease, flaxseed oil can help to calm inflammation and repair any intestinal tract damage. In addition, the oil may prevent painful gallstones from developing and even dissolve existing stones.

Treat acne, eczema, psoriasis, sunburn and rosacea:

The essential fatty acids in flaxseed oil are largely responsible for its skin-healing powers. Red, itchy patches of eczema, psoriasis and rosacea often respond to the EFA’s anti-inflammatory actions and overall skin-soothing properties. Sunburned skin may heal faster when treated with the oil as well. In cases of acne, the EFAs encourage thinning of the oily sebum that clogs pores.

Promote healthy hair and nails:

The abundant omega-3 fatty acids in flaxseed oil have been shown to contribute to healthy hair growth (in fact, low levels of these acids may cause dry and lackluster locks). Hair problems exacerbated by psoriasis or eczema of the scalp may respond to the skin-revitalizing and anti-inflammatory actions of flaxseed oil as well. Similarly, the oil’s EFAs work to nourish dry or brittle nails, stopping them from cracking or splitting.

Minimise nerve damage that causes numbness and tingling as well as other disorders:

The EFAs in flaxseed oil assist in the transmission of nerve impulses, making the oil potentially valuable in treating conditions of numbness and tingling. The oil’s nerve-nourishing actions may also help in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease, a degenerative disorder of the nervous system, and protect against the nerve damage associated with diabetes and multiple sclerosis.

Reduce cancer risk and guard against the effects of ageing:

The lignans in flaxseed appear to play a role in protecting against breast, colon, prostate, and perhaps skin cancer. Although further studies are needed, research undertaken at the University of Toronto indicates that women with breast cancer, regardless of the degree of cancer invasiveness, may benefit from treatment with flaxseed. Interestingly, the lignans may protect against various effects of ageing as well.

Treat menopausal symptoms, menstrual cramps, female infertility and endometriosis: 

Because the hormone-balancing lignans and plant estrogens (phytoestrogens) in flaxseed help stabilise a woman’s estrogen-progesterone ratio, they can have beneficial effects on the menstrual cycle, and relieve the hot flashes of perimenopause and menopause. Flaxseed may also improve uterine function and thus treat fertility problems. In addition, the essential fatty acids in flaxseed have been shown to block production of prostaglandins, hormone like substances that, when released in excess amounts during menstruation, can cause the heavy bleeding associated with endometriosis.

Fight prostate problems, male infertility and impotence:

The EFAs in flaxseed oil may help to prevent swelling and inflammation of the prostate, the small gland located below the bladder in males that tends to enlarge with age. Symptoms of such enlargement, such as urgency to urinate, may lessen as a result. The EFAs also play a role in keeping sperm healthy, which may be of value in treating male infertility, and they can improve blood flow to the penis, a boon for those suffering from impotence.

http://www.herbwisdom.com/herb-flaxseed-oil.html

Cold, Cough & Congestion

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I’ve been fighting the nasty flu for the last 5 days…. with a pinch of fever and a dash of body aches. Oh how I hate the cold… and being ill.

I thought it would be wise to read up on the nasty flu/cold, to help my now sick girlfriend. Merry christmas, I brought you the flu.


The Common Cold

How do you know when you have a common head cold as opposed to a flu virus? Common cold symptoms are less serious than flu symptoms and they usually come on more slowly. You can expect a common cold to last as long as 10 days. Symptoms usually start two to three days after exposure to a cold virus — the incubation period.

There is no cure for the common cold because viruses, unlike bacteria, do not respond to antibiotics. And unlike the flu, common colds can’t be prevented because they are caused by more than 200 different viruses. So if you have a headache and other symptoms due to a common cold, all you can do is take care of yourself and wait it out.

Are There Different Types of Colds?

Head colds and chest colds are the two main types of colds, but they are caused by the same type of virus. If a cold goes down into your chest, you will probably notice a cough along with your stuffy head, headache, nasal congestion, and other symptoms. Having frequent colds does not mean you are getting different types of colds, but that you are getting exposed to different cold viruses. Summer colds are less frequent than winter colds, but they are not different types of colds.

Cold Remedies for Headache and Other Symptoms

There is no remedy that can make your cold go away any faster, but there are things you can do to relieve some of the symptoms, especially when you need a clear head at work:

  • Add moisture. Moistening your upper airway can help loosen secretions and can relieve pressure and congestion. You can do this with saline nasal drops, a humidifier, or by taking a hot, steamy shower. Drinking plenty of fluids helps keep your mucous thin and moving.
  • Over-the-counter pain relievers. Acetaminophen (Tylenol) will help alleviate headache, sore throat, and fever. Make sure not to use aspirin as a pain reliever for kids, as it could lead to a dangerous condition known as Reye’s syndrome.
  • Decongestant nasal sprays. These sprays will open up your nasal passages but must be used with caution, because they can cause a rebound effect that makes your nose even stuffier than before. Don’t use these sprays for children unless you check with your doctor first.
  • Cough and cold preparations. These over-the-counter medicines may combine decongestants, cough suppressants, mucous thinners, and pain relievers. They are mostly safe for adults, but carefully read the side effects. Those that contain antihistamines can make you drowsy and should not be used at work if you need to be alert. These medications are not recommended for children.

Headaches From Other Causes

If over-the-counter medications don’t help and your headaches persist, it’s time to consider other possible causes. One possibility is a sinus infection. With a sinus infection, pain is usually localized over one or more of the sinus areas in the forehead, around the eyes, and over the upper teeth. Sinus pain may get worse with movement. “A cold typically lasts for less than five days and is due to a virus,” says Jordan S. Josephson, MD, a sinus specialist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. “Secretions from a cold usually clear over time and do not need to be treated with an antibiotic. However, if your cold lasts more than seven days or you have increasing fever or pain, consider seeing your doctor to make sure you have not developed a sinus infection. If the mucous turns yellow or green, then an antibiotic may be needed.”

http://www.everydayhealth.com/cold-and-flu/headaches-and-head-colds.aspx


7 Natural Cough Remedies for Persistent & Dry Coughs

There are two primary types of coughs, dry and productive. A productive cough is one in which you are coughing up phlegm or mucous-this is not a cough that should be suppressed, as your body needs to rid itself of the gunk that’s in your chest/lungs. While it shouldn’t be suppressed, some of these remedies will address a productive cough by including an expectorant, or something that loosens mucous and makes it easier for the body to get rid of.

A dry, hacking, cough is another story. This is one we do want to stop. It can be caused byallergies, dry air, a random tickle at the back of your throat that won’t go away, the aftermath of a cold, being in a dusty environment, etc. etc. For these we turn to demulcents, ingredients that soothe irritated mucous membranes and remove the irritant triggering the cough. Studies conducted in 2004 found that the main ingredients in cough syrup (dextromethorphan and diphenhydramine) have the same effectiveness in treating coughs as a placebo ingredient. Instead of turning to chemical solutions for every minor ailment, try some home remedies instead. They are not only better for you, but they taste a whole lot better than most cough syrup too!

1. A Spoonful of Honey

Studies, such as one conducted at Penn State College of Medicine, have found that honey can work more efficiently to calm a cough than over-the-counter drugs. It is a rich demulcent, with a high viscosity and stickiness that does an incredible job of coating and soothing those irritated mucous membranes. Thanks to an enzyme added by bees when they harvest honey, it also hasantibacterial properties as well, which may help shorten how long you have the cough if it is due to bacterial illness.

Note: This is an excellent alternative remedy for both kids and adults, but should never be given to children under the age of 2 years due to the risk of botulism.

You will need…

-1 tablespoon of organic, raw, honey

Directions

Take 1 tablespoon of honey 1-3 times daily as needed to control coughing. Take immediately before bed if cough is disrupting your sleep. For children, you can adjust the dosing to 1 teaspoon up to one tablespoon.

2. Licorice Root Tea

Licorice root is both an expectorant and demulcent, simultaneously soothing your airways while loosening and thinning mucous, easing congestion. It can also ease any inflammation that may be irritating your throat. Its main constituent, glycyrrhizin, is responsible for most of its effects. 30-50 times sweeter than sucrose (table sugar), it inhibits an enzyme 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (how would like you to write that on a name tag?) This enzyme regulates access of glucocorticoid (a steroid hormone) to steroid receptors, ultimately slowing the conversion of cortisol to cortisone. This increases the effect of cortisol and reducing inflammation. If you are on steroids, or have any problems with your kidneys, it is best to steer clear of licorice root.

You will need…

-2 tablespoons of dried licorice root
-8 ounces of fresh water

Directions

Bring water to a boil and place the licorice root in a mug. Cover with water and steep for 10-15 minutes. Drink the entire cup up to 2 times daily.

3. Gargle Salt Water

Also a popular remedy for sore throats, salt water can ease the discomfort caused by a cough the same way it helps a sore throat-through osmosis. When the concentration of salt is higher outside of the cells in your mucous membranes, water flows out of the cells to balance everything out. When water leaves the cells, swelling goes down, and discomfort is decreased. If you have a cough that happens to come along with inflamed tissue, this is a good route to take. It can also help dislodge any phlegm that’s hanging out and allow you to expel it easily.

You will need…

-1 teaspoon of salt
-8 ounces of warm water

Directions

Stir salt into water until it is thoroughly dissolved. Gargle for 15 seconds, spit, and repeat with the remaining water. Rinse with plain water afterwards.

4. Steam, Steam, Steam!

I can’t say how underrated steam is when it comes to anything dealing with a cough, cold, or congestion. Not only does the steam quite literally loosen mucous and phlegm, almost immediately, but you can add numerous essential oils that will impart wonderful healing benefits. These benefits (anti-viral, anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory etc.) do become airborne, so you inhale them while you breathe in the steam. For this particular blend I’ve included both tea tree oil and eucalyptus oil, which can help soothe and open your airways as well as help fight off bacteria or a virus.

You will need…

-3 drops of tea tree oil
-1-2 drops of eucalyptus oil
-A bowl of water
-A soft, clean, towel

Directions

Bring enough water to a boil to halfway fill a medium size-heat proof bowl. Pour the water into it, let it cool slightly for 30-60 seconds, and add the essential oils, giving it a quick stir to release the vapors. Lean over the bowl and get as close as you can while still being comfortable. Remember that steam can seriously burn! Use the towel to cover your head like a tent, trapping the steam, and breathe deeply. Ideally, do this for 5-10 minutes 2-3 times a day.

5. Tea Thyme

Thyme has been used for centuries, and was even used during one of the most devastating pandemics to take place in human history. The Black Death was a plague that peaked in Europe from 1346-1353. During that time, and in other incidents of the plague thereafter, townspeople would gather to burn large bundles of thyme to ward off the disease, or carry pockets of thyme on them. Indeed, thyme does have anti-microbial properties, but we’re not warding off any plague here-just your cough. Thyme relaxes the muscles of the trachea and bronchi, and also opens up airways. The result is less coughing, and increased comfort.

You will need…

-a handful of fresh thyme sprigs OR 2 tablespoons dried thyme
-8 ounces of fresh water
-Honey or lemon (optional)

Directions

Lightly bruise the thyme, e.g. with a mortar and pestle, and then place in a mug. Cover with 8 ounces of boiling water, cover, and let it steep for 10-15 minutes. Add some lemon or honey to taste, and drink the whole thing. Repeat 2-3 times daily as needed. It’s absolutely delightful just before bedtime (unless you aren’t a fan of thyme. But drink some anyways.)

6. Pepper & Honey

Black pepper is the world’s most traded spice, but most of its use is limited to the culinary world. What people don’t know is that it can make a great remedy for coughs that are accompanied by a lot of mucous or chest congestion. If you’ve accidently leaned too close to black pepper while it’s being grinded, you know it can make you cough or tickle your nose. This may not be fun on a regular basis, but it’s a plus if you need to expel all the nasty stuff that’s gunking up your lungs. The honey adds its antibacterial properties, and it makes it so the pepper isn’t too irritating. You can make black pepper “syrup” with honey, or a tea, as below. If possible, use freshly ground black pepper, as the pre-ground pepper simply seems to lose some of its punch.

You will need…

-1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
-1 tablespoon of honey
-8 ounces of fresh water

Directions

Place the pepper and honey in a mug and then cover with boiling water. Give it stir to disperse the pepper flakes and melt in the honey. Steep for 10 minutes, stir once more, and drink in its entirety. Repeat 1-2 times a day as needed to loosen mucous.

7. Ginger Peppermint Syrup

Here you get the soothing qualities of warming ginger, all wrapped up in a delicious easy to swallow cough syrup. Spicy ginger works as an expectorant, helping loosen and expel mucous from the lungs. It can also stop the painful tickle at the back of throat that can trigger a cough if the first place, if you are experiencing a dry cough. The peppermint will also help relieve the irritating tickle of a cough.

You will need…

-3 tablespoons of chopped ginger
-1 tablespoon of dried peppermint
-4 cups of water
-1 cup of honey

Directions

Chop the ginger and add it along with the peppermint to 4 cups of water. Bring to a boil and then lower the heat so that the liquid simmer. Simmer until the liquid has been reduced by half, than strain. Let it cool slightly, and then stir in 1 cup of honey until it has been dissolved completely. Bottle and take 1 tablespoon every few hours as needed to ease your cough. Keep refrigerated for up to 3 weeks.

Tips:

-I cannot stress the importance of covering your tea while it steeps. Not only does it keep it piping hot, it traps all the steam and any of the volatile oils in the steam (and their benefits) in the cup for you to inhale when you uncover it.

http://everydayroots.com/cough-remedies

Weston A. Price – Restoring nutrient-dense foods to the human diet

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Characteristics of Traditional Diets

  1. The diets of healthy primitive and nonindustrialized peoples contain no refined or denatured foods such as refined sugar or corn syrup; white flour; canned foods; pasteurized, homogenized, skim or low-fat milk; refined or hydrogenated vegetable oils; protein powders; artificial vitamins or toxic additives and colorings.
  2. All traditional cultures consume some sort of animal protein and fat from fish and other seafood; water and land fowl; land animals; eggs; milk and milk products; reptiles; and insects.
  3. Primitive diets contain at least four times the calcium and other minerals and TEN times the fat soluble vitamins from animal fats (vitamin A, vitamin D and the Price Factor–now believed to be vitamin K2) as the average American diet.
  4. In all traditional cultures, some animal products are eaten raw.
  5. Primitive and traditional diets have a high food-enzyme content from raw dairy products, raw meat and fish; raw honey; tropical fruits; cold-pressed oils; wine and unpasteurized beer; and naturally preserved, lacto-fermented vegetables, fruits, beverages, meats and condiments.
  6. Seeds, grains and nuts are soaked, sprouted, fermented or naturally leavened in order to neutralize naturally occuring antinutrients in these foods, such as phytic acid, enzyme inhibitors, tannins and complex carbohydrates.
  7. Total fat content of traditional diets varies from 30% to 80% but only about 4% of calories come from polyunsaturated oils naturally occurring in grains, pulses, nuts, fish, animal fats and vegetables. The balance of fat calories is in the form of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids.
  8. Traditional diets contain nearly equal amounts of omega-6 and omega-3 essential fatty acids.
  9. All primitive diets contain some salt.
  10. Traditional cultures consume animal bones, usually in the form of gelatin-rich bone broths.
  11. Traditional cultures make provisions for the health of future generations by providing special nutrient-rich foods for parents-to-be, pregnant women and growing children; by proper spacing of children; and by teaching the principles of right diet to the young.

Dietary Guidelines

  1. Eat whole, natural foods.
  2. Eat only foods that will spoil, but eat them before they do.
  3. Eat naturally-raised meat including fish, seafood, poultry, beef, lamb, game, organ meats and eggs.
  4. Eat whole, naturally-produced milk products from pasture-fed cows, preferably raw and/or fermented, such as whole yogurt, cultured butter, whole cheeses and fresh and sour cream.
  5. Use only traditional fats and oils including butter and other animal fats, extra virgin olive oil, expeller expressed sesame and flax oil and the tropical oils—coconut and palm.
  6. Eat fresh fruits and vegetables, preferably organic, in salads and soups, or lightly steamed.
  7. Use whole grains and nuts that have been prepared by soaking, sprouting or sour leavening to neutralize phytic acid and other anti-nutrients.
  8. Include enzyme-enhanced lacto-fermented vegetables, fruits, beverages and condiments in your diet on a regular basis.
  9. Prepare homemade meat stocks from the bones of chicken, beef, lamb or fish and use liberally in soups and sauces.
  10. Use herb teas and coffee substitutes in moderation.
  11. Use filtered water for cooking and drinking.
  12. Use unrefined Celtic sea salt and a variety of herbs and spices for food interest and appetite stimulation.
  13. Make your own salad dressing using raw vinegar, extra virgin olive oil and expeller expressed flax oil.
  14. Use natural sweeteners in moderation, such as raw honey, maple syrup, dehydrated cane sugar juice and stevia powder.
  15. Use only unpasteurized wine or beer in strict moderation with meals.
  16. Cook only in stainless steel, cast iron, glass or good quality enamel.
  17. Use only natural supplements.
  18. Get plenty of sleep, exercise and natural light.
  19. Think positive thoughts and minimize stress.
  20. Practice forgiveness.

Dietary Dangers

  1. Don’t eat commercially processed foods such as cookies, cakes, crackers, TV dinners, soft drinks, packaged sauce mixes, etc.
  2. Avoid all refined sweeteners such as sugar, dextrose, glucose and high fructose corn syrup.
  3. Avoid white flour, white flour products and white rice.
  4. Avoid all hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated fats and oils.
  5. Avoid all vegetable oils made from soy, corn, safflower, canola or cottonseed.
  6. Do not use polyunsaturated oils for cooking, sauteing or baking.
  7. Avoid fried foods.
  8. Do not practice veganism; animal products provide vital nutrients not found in plant foods.
  9. Avoid products containing protein powders.
  10. Avoid pasteurized milk; do not consume lowfat milk, skim milk, powdered milk or imitation milk products.
  11. Avoid battery-produced eggs and factory-farmed meats.
  12. Avoid highly processed luncheon meats and sausage containing MSG and other additives.
  13. Avoid rancid and improperly prepared seeds, nuts and grains found in granolas, quick rise breads and extruded breakfast cereals, as they block mineral absorption and cause intestinal distress.
  14. Avoid canned, sprayed, waxed, bioengineered or irradiated fruits and vegetables.
  15. Avoid artificial food additives, especially MSG, hydrolyzed vegetable protein and aspartame, which are neurotoxins. Most soups, sauce and broth mixes and commercial condiments contain MSG, even if not so labeled.
  16. Avoid caffeine-containing beverages such as coffee, tea and soft drinks. Avoid chocolate.
  17. Avoid aluminum-containing foods such as commercial salt, baking powder and antacids. Do not use aluminum cookware or aluminum-containing deodorants.
  18. Do not drink fluoridated water.
  19. Avoid synthetic vitamins and foods containing them.
  20. Do not drink distilled liquors.
  21. Do not use a microwave oven.

http://www.westonaprice.org/health-topics/abcs-of-nutrition/dietary-guidelines/

Healing Leaky Gut Syndrome

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Healing Leaky Gut Syndrome

1. To re-balance gut bacteria, eliminate beans, grains, and sugars, including most fruit. Eat

primarily soups, (bone broths are ideal), fermented dairy (yogurt and kefir), free range eggs,

grass fed meats from organic grass-fed livestock and all the green vegetables you like.

2. Fermented Foods are a great way to re-populate the gut bacteria. Miso, kimchi, kombucha,

yogurt, kefir.

3. Take 1Tbsp organic raw tahini daily

4. Take 1 Tbsp organic coconut oil daily

5. Follow recipe below for real “Gell-O”. Eat several squares daily.

Real “GELL-O” Heals

Real ”Gell-O” made from protein collagen gelatin is incredibly healing to the lining of the gut. It

helps form collagen and contains the major amino acids lycine, glycine and proline shown to repair

the nervous system, the gut, hair, skin and nails. Gelatin can rehabilitate the gut by helping the body

make its own digestive enzymes—a crucial step in absorbing proteins, vitamins and minerals from

your food—and is very soothing to an agitated digestive tract.

The following recipe uses collagen protein gelatin from 100% organic, non-GMO grass fed cows.

Helps the body utilize proteins from other foods more fully

WHAT YOU WILL NEED:

• One canister of Great Lakes unflavored Beef Gelatin (100% organic, non-GMO, grass-fed)

• Water

• Organic Stevia

• Herbal Tea Bags (your preference—some options are: herbal peach tea, black cherry,

tangerine, hibiscus, etc)

HOW TO MAKE GELL-O:

1) Boil 4 cups of water.

2) Add 3-4 tea bags; let tea bags steep for 4-5 minutes.

3) Take pot off burner and add one dropper full of stevia.

4) Sprinkle in 2 tablespoons of gelatin (the container says 1 tbsp. per 2 cups of water)

5) Let it dissolve a little, then stir it. A frother may work well to mix it better.

TIPS AND IDEAS:

– Eat a few squares per day.

– Freeze to make Gell-O Pops

– Put Gell-O in smoothies

– Mix in Yogurts, Applesauce for kids


Great Lakes Unflavored Beef Gelatin

Paleo Pizza/Pizza Crust

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paleo-leap-68

Paleo pizza recipe

Serves 4

Crust ingredients

  • ½ cup coconut flour;
  • 1 cup almond meal;
  • 1 tsp baking powder;
  • 2 tsp garlic powder;
  • 4 eggs;
  • 3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil;
  • ½ cup coconut milk;

Topping ingredients

  • A few tbsp tomato pesto or of your favorite tomato sauce;
  • 8 sun-dried tomatoes, chopped;
  • 3 artichoke hearts, chopped;
  • 8 button mushrooms, sliced;
  • 1 tbsp coconut oil, for cooking;
  • 50g-100g good quality cooked ham, shaved (amount depends on your preference);

newyorkstylepaleopizzacrust

NY Style Pizza Crust

1 tablespoon gluten-free yeast
1 tablespoon raw honey
1/4 cup warm water (should feel warm on the inside of your wrist, but not burn)

3/4 cup almond flour
3/4 cup tapioca starch
3/4 teaspoon sea salt

1 tablespoon olive oil (or other melted fat if you’re opposed to heating olive oil)
1 tablespoon egg whites (less than one egg)
1 1/2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar

and of course your favorite toppings!

pizza0

Cauliflower Crust Bacon Pizza

MAKES: 3-4 MINI PIES

ingredients:

365 organic tomato basil sauce
1 head cauliflower
2 egg whites
coconut flour (tropical traditions)
1 med-large onion
2/3 cup spinach
1/2 cup bacon bits
spices
garlic powder
Italian seasoning (oregano, marjoram, thyme, basil, rosemary, sage)
crushed black pepper

directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F.
  2. Rinse and prepare cauliflower into a rice-like texture. You can finely shred in a food processor or grate by hand.
  3. Put cauliflower “rice” in a large pot and steam till soft. Set aside and let cool.
  4. Take ~3 strips of (beef) bacon, cook and shred into little bits.
  5. Cook spinach and warm up your sauce.
  6. Cut onion into rings and fry till soft and caramelized.
  7. Take your cooled down cauliflower and add spices, eggs whites and spoonful of coconut flour to bind it. Mix and separate into even portions.
  8. Place parchment paper on a baking sheet. Mold each portion into a pie crust on your paper and place into hot oven.
  9. Cook crust for 15 minutes or until it feels firm (it will depend on how thick you make the pies and how wet the cauliflower is.)
  10. Take out of oven and add warm sauce and layer your toppings. I start with spinach, then onions, and then bacon.

carrot crust

CARROT CRUST

Ingredients

  • 4 cups of grated, and squeezed* carrots
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 3 eggs
  • 4 tablespoons coconut flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • freshly ground pepper to taste
  • 1/2 teaspoon cardamom (optional, and I included it for the lamb bastila, for which I made the crust)

Process

  1. Preheat the oven to 180C (about 350F). Prepare a springform cake tin as follows: butter the bottom and sides and line with parchment paper. The butter is used so the paper will adhere to the pan.
  2. Add some olive oil (or additional, melted butter) on top of the paper and with your hands or a paper towel, spread the oil around the parchment paper. Set aside.
  3. Peel about 6-8 large carrots. I used a hand grater to grate them. Then I squeezed the water (carrot juice) out of them and measured the “dried” results into 4 cups. (I used a dry ingredients U.S. measuring cup.)
  4. Place the grated carrots in a large bowl. Add the butter and eggs, and with your hands mix well, cutting the butter into the mixture.
  5. Add the coconut flour and spices, and knead until all is well blended.
  6. Scoop the carrot mixture into the prepared cake tin and using your hands, spread it out evenly to form a pie shell (covering the sides of the tin as well as the bottom).  
  7. Baking time depends on what you will make with the crust afterwards. I baked mine for 35 minutes and then baked it again with the filling another 25 minutes.

Pizza Crusts: http://paleononpaleo.com/paleo-pizza/

Creative Pizza Crusts: http://paleogrubs.com/pizza-crust-recipes

elimination provocation diet

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Food sensitivities are shiftier and can exact an even greater toll on our health because they’re more challenging to identify, often causing the ensuing cellular inflammation to rage on for years. Many people have food sensitivities and have no idea.

Because a food sensitivity often rears its ugly head a few days after the offender is eaten, it can make it difficult to trace the irritation to a particular food. Identifying these rabble rousers can have a profound effect on your health, as silent inflammation is a major player in the onset of all degenerative diseases, according to the functional medicine community.

Symptoms of food sensitivities include, but are not limited to: fatigue, drowsiness after eating, brain fog, poor memory and concentration, agitation, mood swings, intense cravings (especially sugar, refined carbs, and starch), abdominal cramping, difficulty losing weight, depression, restlessness, irritability, headaches (including migraines), swollen and painful joints, muscle pain and stiffness, gas, bloating, flatulence, indigestion, heartburn, constipation, blurry vision, broken sleep, skin issues (eczema, psoriasis, acne), recurring sinusitis, and asthma.

Dang, right?

Here’s another kicker. Eating foods that we are sensitive to can also up the ante on autoimmunity, including autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto’s). Just as the body launches a seek-and-destroy mission on the thyroid in the case of Hashimoto’s, the body will also see offending or inflammatory foods as the enemy and will antagonize the whole autoimmune response, making it difficult to get a handle on Hashimoto’s, or any autoimmune condition.

And…eating foods that our bodies see as “enemies” also increases our stress response, causing our adrenals to pump out even more stress hormones (adrenaline and cortisol). So while having a food sensitivity itself can cause people to hold on to weight or gain weight, wayward cortisol (“the belly fat hormone”) sets up camp around our midsection.

How To Snuff out the Fire

This Elimination/Provocation Diet (eliminate, then provoke the body) is very telling and can have a life-changing impact on your long-term health. It can be one of the most important things you ever do for your wellbeing and is considered “the gold standard” for identifying foods that don’t love you back. (Forget blood (ALCAT, for example) or skin testing for food sensitivities – these tests are a waste of time and money, as they’re been repeatedly proven to be inconclusive.)

Eliminate these foods 100% for three weeks:

  • eggs
  • dairy
  • gluten (including wheat, barley, and rye) *
  • soy
  • nightshades (eggplant, tomatoes, potatoes, tobacco, and peppers, including cayenne powder)
  • corn
  • nuts
  • peanuts (which are legumes, not nuts)
  • shellfish

* If you have Hashimoto’s, gluten should be categorically, 100% avoided, always. Do not reintroduce.

After three weeks of this clean slate, reintroduce each food one at a time, eating 3-4 servings of that specific food on your reintroduction day. (Nightshades and nuts don’t need to be separated out, meaning on the day of your nightshade reintroduction, you can eat any and all nightshades and on the day of nut reintroduction, you can eat any and all nuts.)

Monitor symptoms for 2-3 days. If you have a reaction, BAM. There’s your answer. Reactions include an acute occurance of any of the symptoms listed above.

If you have a reaction, eliminate that food for approximately three more months while you continue to take a quality probiotic, glutamine, and to drink bone broth. If you think three months is a long time, ask yourself if you’re willing to live with your symptoms – and your autoimmunity. What if, after three or so months, your gut was healed (for some, it takes longer) and you could reintroduce that prior troublemaker without problems? When you think about the span of your lifetime, three months just doesn’t seem like that long, does it?

An easy way to eliminate these potentially offending foods is to use a combination of 1. Sarah Schatz’s amazing meal plans and; 2. Dr. Mark Hyman’s Ultra Simple Diet. In his book by the same name, he shares a shopping list, meal plans, and recipes. These resources offer the easiest (and most enjoyable) way I know of to eat well and keep blood sugar balanced during this “diet.” (I hate that word.) This is a cleansing and detoxifying diet, and many people feel amazing – lighter and brighter, more energetic, more positive, and most people report losing a few pounds within a mere week.

Please know that elimination of foods we’re sensitive to can cause withdrawal symptoms for some people, such as fatigue, headache, or mild skin reactions. These usually subside in 2-3 days, so don’t despair. Taking a heaping teaspoon of powdered fiber (not Metamucil – something like this (or any gluten free psyllium, triphala, or acacia fiber)) in 8 oz. of water and/or taking activated charcoal capsules can alleviate symptoms quickly.

Recommendations and tips:

  • Read all food labels – the food industry can be tricky with naming ingredients.
  • Many prepared foods have hidden additives and fillers that contain wheat and egg byproducts.
  • Avoid packaged, canned, and convenience foods during this “diet.” (I hate that word.)

https://www.healthfulelements.com/blog/2012/09/foods-dont-love-you-back


Quick overview:

•    Prior to starting, take a week to journal/document all foods eaten within a day and perform for 7 consecutive days.
•    Document all physical, behavioral, and emotional concerns to determine a baseline.
•    Set a date on the calendar to start the program. (Allow for mental preparation.)
•    Plan meals in advance to ensure sticking to the program.

Action Steps:

•    Eliminate the most common foods that trigger sensitivities: gluten, dairy, eggs, corn, and soy.
•    Eliminate for two to four weeks, and then reintroduce each food, one at a time, every 72-96 hours.
•    Monitor yourself closely for reactions, which can be emotional, behavioral, physical, cognitive, and social.
•    When reintroducing a food group (dairy), make sure to journal all symptoms and any changes in behavior for up to 4 days.
•    Make sure to also document the time of day and the intensity of reactions.
•    If no reactions occur upon reintroduction, still proceed with caution by rotating that food group with a frequency of every 2-3 days to avoid re-reaction.
•    After 4-6 weeks, a more regular eating schedule is usually appropriate for the previously offending food.
•    When offending foods are found upon reintroduction, remove that food group for another 2-3 months, followed by the above reintroduction plan.

Most common foods that trigger sensitivities are: gluten, dairy, eggs, corn, and soy. 

Foods to avoid

•    ALL processed sugars and sweeteners.
•    Grains: Wheat, oats, rice, barley, buckwheat, corn, quinoa, etc.
•    Dairy: Milk, cream, cheese, butter, whey. Ghee is OK.
•    Eggs or foods that contain eggs (such as mayonnaise)
•    Soy: Soy milk, soy sauce, tofu, tempeh, soy protein, etc.
•    ALL processed foods
•    Canned foods

Foods to include

•    All veggies:  Asparagus, spinach, lettuce, broccoli, beets, cauliflower, carrots, celery, artichokes, garlic, onions, zucchini, squash, rhubarb, cucumbers, turnips, watercress, etc. ( I realize that many of your children don’t eat any of these, so just try to incorporate as many veggies as possible.).
•    Meats: Fish, chicken, beef, lamb, organ meats, etc. Best choices are grass-fed and preferably from a local farm.
•    All fruits
•    Gluten-free grain: quinoa, tapioca, and sorghum.
•    All rice
•    Nuts and seeds
•    Coconut: Coconut oil, coconut butter, coconut milk, coconut cream.
•    Olives and olive oil


The basic idea is: autoimmune disorders begin in the gut as it is from the intestines that nutrients are absorbed (or not) into the bloodstream and that foods that we are sensitive to can rupture the gut lining, so to speak, and cause other things besides nutrients to pass into the bloodstream (like undigested food, which gets attacked by your immune system which senses an invader-this is known as “leaky gut”).

Avoiding foods that may have an adverse effect on digestion, as improper digestion due to hard-to-digest foods is thought to be the cause of all autoimmune disorders.

So the deal with an elimination diet is: cut a bunch of stuff out at once, give it long enough to get out of your system; add it back in one at a time. Observe and record results. Repeat if necessary.

So I dug in, and decided it was time for a Whole30. Basically they created a 30 day Paleo reboot where you are challenged to only eat Whole foods for 30 days. You do not consume any grains on the program, which I’d already eliminated. In addition, I took their clean eating Paleo approach and cut out dairy, legumes, any added sweetener, artificial or real, and seed oils (canola, corn, etc), and alcohol. As per the Whole30, we put away the scale for 30 days. On top of that, I followed the Paleo Autoimmune Protocol and cut out seeds, nuts, nightshades (tomato, potato, peppers, eggplant) eggs, and caffeine.

http://www.liaprusha.com/?p=42