This Girl Can

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I stumbled across this video and fell in love with the campaign.

This Girl Can celebrates the women who are doing their thing no matter how they do it, how they look or even how sweaty they get. They’re here to inspire us to wiggle, jiggle, move and prove that judgement is a barrier that can be overcome.

http://www.thisgirlcan.co.uk

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Dr. Axe’s – Lose 20 lbs in 30 days

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The most common things that can get in the way:

  • Thyroid issues
  • Leaky Gut
  • Adrenal Fatigue
  • Cellular Toxicity
  • Candida
  • Lack of Motivation and Time

The good news is I have developed a comprehensive, all-natural plan to help you burn the belly fat, lose the love handles, melt your muffin top and banish cellulite fast!

There are 3 keys on how to lose 20 pounds in 30 days:

  1. Remove the metabolism death foods
  2. Eat the 4 fat burning foods daily
  3. Do Interval exercise 3x a week
  4. Take 3 important supplements

Metabolism DEATH Foods

There are 3 main foods that can absolutely ruin your weight loss efforts. I call these the metabolism death foods. You will want to remove and replace this foods with healthy alternatives if you want to see quick results.


Processed Sugar
 – Contrary to popular belief, fat isn’t the first thing that will make you fat, it’s consuming too much sugar. Also, sugar can be hidden under names like: corn syrup, dextrose, fructose, juice concentrate, maltodextrin, raw sugar and brown sugar.

These sugars can often be hidden in things that sound like health foods including: fruit juice, granola bars, dressings and protein bars.

What to do instead: All of these types of sugar you will want to eliminate and replace with green stevia and raw honey but even both of these in moderation.

Whole Grains – I know it may seem like “whole grains” like wheat bread are healthy but most are far from helping your metabolism. Three of the main compounds in grains such as wheat include gluten, starch and phytic acid all of which can cause issues. Gluten causes inflammation, starch turns into sugar quickly and phytic acid binds to minerals so you are not really getting many nutrients when you consume whole grains.

What to do instead: A better option for fat loss is replacing your daily intake of grains with fruits and vegetables or consuming up to 1 piece daily of a sprouted grain bread or sourdough. When it comes to using flour switch to coconut flour it’s the perfect flour for fat loss.
Canola or Vegetable Oils – If you use canola oil or other vegetable oils it’s sure to slow down your fat loss and cause you to store unwanted body fat. They hydrogenated oils that are genetically modified (GMO) cause inflammation throughout your body, cellular toxicity and are high in calories.

What to do instead: Replace all vegetables oils with coconut oil and grass-fed butter to promote more rapid fat loss.

The Metabolism REVIVING Foods

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Make a Strength Training Plan

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Pump Some Iron—Getting Started

Starting a strength training program is a little more complicated than just grabbing some dumbbells and your favorite gym tee and hoisting away—it requires a set program. Before hitting the weights, check out these tips to get started on the right foot:

  • Set goals! Goals should be the driving force of any strength training program. Follow the SMART acronym (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, and Time bound) and make sure to set both short and long-term targets.
  • Start small. Three days a week (on non-consecutive days) for 45-minute sessions should be enough for most individuals to see big gains starting out, says Trink. Any longer and the chance of injury skyrockets.
  • Focus on compound lifts. Gary advocates multi-joint exercises (think squats and deadlifts) as the backbone of any strength training program. By using big moves, lifters can get more done in less time. Plus, it always pays to focus on (and master!) the basics before moving on.
  • Prioritize Lifts. Put the most important exercises first. That way, fatigue won’t compromise form on the biggest lifts . In general, compound lifts should go first with more isolated exercises (finally, a spot for curls) towards the end of the workout.
  • Watch the clock. Limit rest periods between sets to maximize efficiency in the gym. Trink uses the following guidelines:
    • 6 reps or less = rest 2-3 minutes
    • Above 6 reps = rest 75 seconds or less
  • Combine cardio and strength. Gary recommends performing exercises back-to-back (referred to as supersets in the fitness realm) to get the benefits of strength and cardio. By supersetting compound lifts, you’ll get your heart rate up and get a great cardio workout on the weight room floor.
  • Log all workouts. Keeping track of sets, reps, and exercises is crucial for noting progress and identifying when it’s time to up the intensity. Write down sets, reps, and weights used for all workouts. Keeping a log also acts as a motivator!
  • Vary the program. Avoid sticking to the same routine for more than six weeks, Trink advises. Lifters should switch up their program to avoid getting bored and plateauing (going a few weeks without seeing any results).
  • Don’t skip the extras. Make time for foam rolling and stretching to help prevent muscles from tightening up and to stay injury-free!

3, 2, 1… Lift Off!—Your Action Plan

Ready to get started? Whether you’ve got three, four, or five days to devote to training, these programs will help you make the most out of hitting the gym.

I Have… 3 Days a Week

Your plan: Total Body Routine

Why it works: This program hits all major muscle groups during each workout, yielding maximum gains in minimum time.

What to do: Complete 2-3 sets of 10-12 reps of the following exercises. Note: Perform A and B exercises back-to-back as supersets. Rest 60 seconds between each exercise.

Monday (Day One)

1A) Barbell Deadlift
1B) Dumbbell Bench Press

2A) Lunge (bodyweight or using dumbbells)
2B) Single-Arm Dumbbell Shoulder Press

3A) Leg Press
3B) Plank (Hold for 30-45 seconds)

Wednesday (Day Two)

1A) Barbell Back Squat
1B) Chin-up (bodyweight or assisted)

2A) Single-Arm Dumbbell Row
2B) Singe-Leg Stability Ball Hamstring Curl

3A) Side Lunges (bodyweight or using dumbbells)
3B) Reverse Crunch

Friday (Day Three)

1A) Barbell Front Squat
1B) Inverted Row

2A) Single-Leg Dumbbell Deadlift
2B) Incline Dumbbell Bench Press

3A) Reverse Lunge (bodyweight or using dumbbells)
3B) Side Plank (Hold for 30-45 seconds)

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High Intensity Interval Training – HITT

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WHAT IS HIIT?

HIIT is a training idea in which low to moderate intensity intervals are alternated with high intensity intervals.

HIIT can be applied to running or to exercises such as squatting. HIIT is considered to be much more effective than normal cardio because the intensity is higher and you are able to increase both your aerobic and anaerobic endurance while burning more fat than ever before.

“In research, HIIT has been shown to burn adipose tissue more effectively than low-intensity exercise – up to 50% more efficiently.” It has also been shown to speed up your metabolism which helps you burn more calories throughout the day. (www.musclemedia.com)

HIIT improves both energy systems for endurance:

ANAEROBIC ENERGY SYSTEM

Anaerobic literally means “Without oxygen.” The anaerobic energy system is what provides energy in all out efforts of up to 1 minute. For the first 10-15 seconds, the phosphate pool is used up and after that, glycolysis and lactic acid are involved in the effort.

During 10-15 second bursts, there is a very small amount of lactic acid produced. Rest periods of 30 seconds to a minute will provide complete recovery of the Adenosine Triphosphate-Creatine Phosphate (ATP-CP) system. During efforts of more than 10-15 seconds, a large amount of lactic acid is produced and such efforts are extremely taxing on both the athlete’s muscles and their Central Nervous System (CNS).

AEROBIC ENERGY SYSTEM

Aerobic literally means “with oxygen.” This energy system is utilized during prolonged exercise over a period of at least 3-4 minutes. As long as there is enough oxygen to provide energy, the fatigue that you experience will remain at a low level.

This is the reason why many track and field athletes train at higher altitudes where there is less oxygen. By training at high altitudes, they can increase the number of red blood cells which will help them to perform for a longer period of time with little to no fatigue throughout.

WHAT IS THE BEST HIIT WORKOUT? BE SPECIFIC AND MAKE SURE TO LIST EXERCISES, REPS, SETS, ETC.

HIIT can be used with a few different goals in mind – to lose as much fat as possible while cutting or bulking, or to improve aerobic and anaerobic endurance as much as possible. Diet will mostly determine how these goals are achieved by manipulating calories and macronutrient ratios.

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Build Muscle & Lose Fat simultaneously

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Why Losing Fat and Gaining Muscle is Tricky

There’s a good reason why many people believe wholeheartedly in the old bodybuilding adage that you can’t build muscle while cutting fat, and must deal with getting fat if you want to build any real muscle.

Building muscle while burning fat–achieving a “body recomp” as it’s called–doesn’t come with haphazard effort. It requires that you do a bunch of little things right, with both your diet and training.

Why is that, though? What is the physiological barrier that we’re running up against?

Well, I’ve answered this in other articles, but I’m going to give a summary here in case you missed them.

The problem we must overcome to build muscle while we burn fat has to do with something called protein synthesis. To quote my previous article on muscle recovery:

“Every day, our muscle cells go through a natural process whereby degraded cells are eliminated, and new cells are created to take their place. This process is known as ‘protein biosynthesis,’ or ‘protein synthesis.’

“Under normal health and dietary circumstances, muscle tissue is fairly stable, and the cycle of cellular degradation and regeneration remains balanced.  That is, the average person doesn’t lose or gain muscle at an accelerated rate–his or her lean mass more or less remains level. (Well, we actually slowly lose lean mass as we age, but you get the point.)

“When we engage in resistance training, we damage the cells in our muscle fibers, and this signals the body to accelerate the normal rate of protein synthesis to repair the large amount of damaged cells.

“Our body is smart about it, too.

“It doesn’t want to just repair the muscle fiber to its previous state–it wants to adapt it to better deal with the type of stimulus that caused the damage. That is, it wants to add cells to the muscle fibers, which makes them bigger and stronger.

“Thus, what we think of as just “muscle growth” is actually the result of protein synthesis rates exceeding protein breakdown rates. At the end of, let’s say, every 24-hour period, if your body synthesized more muscle proteins than it lost, you gained muscle. If it didn’t, you didn’t.”

Now, let’s apply that knowledge to the issue at hand.

In order to lose fat, you need to give your body less energy (food) than it burns every day.This is known is creating a “calorie deficit.”

No calorie deficit, no losing fat, period.

There are physiological changes other than fat loss that occur when you do this though. The two primary negative effects are:

That is, a calorie deficit reduces your body’s ability to properly repair the damage you cause to your muscles through exercise (to build its muscles bigger and stronger).

So, now that you have a better understanding of the problem, let’s talk about what it takes to overcome it.

How to Build Muscle and Burn Fat at the Same Time

Just because your body can lose fat while building muscle doesn’t mean it comes easily.

The first thing you should know is that even when you do it right, muscle growth during a body recomp is slower than muscle growth during a proper “bulk.” As covered earlier, you are fighting an uphill battle in terms of protein synthesis, no matter how you cut it.

So be patient when you strive to build muscle and burn fat. Wild claims on the Internet about losing double-digit amounts of body fat and gaining the same in muscle are either lies, or involved the use of various drugs.

Based on my experience, here are the key points for effectively gaining muscle and losing fat:

Follow a set meal plan that keeps you in a moderate calorie deficit.

The more you restrict your calories, the more protein synthesis is inhibited.

Thus, it’s very important that you don’t try to rush your diet by putting yourself in a large (greater than 20%) daily calorie deficit.

I give a very simple formula for weight loss in my books that results in about a 20% daily caloric deficit if you’re exercising 4-6 hours per week:

  • 1.2 grams of protein per pound of body weight, per day
  • 1 gram of carbohydrate per pound of body weight, per day
  • .2 grams of fat per pound of body weight, per day

This gives you a good starting point, and you can adjust up or down as needed

Oh and in case you’re worried that eating that many carbs per day will prevent you from losing weight, rest easy–eating carbs does not inhibit weight loss. In fact, keeping your carbs moderate/high is an important part of building muscle while losing fat, mainly because ithelps preserve your strength in the gym, and the insulin your body produces to process the carbs helps prevent protein breakdown.

So, once you have your daily numbers, the next step is to create a meal plan–an exact list of foods you can eat every day to hit those numbers.

The easiest way to do this is to open Excel and www.calorieking.com, and start piecing together meals using foods that you like.

Play with meal frequency and add and subtract foods as desired until you have a daily eating schedule that fits your schedule, lifestyle, and nutritional targets.

Then just follow that plan every day, throw in a cheat meal once per week where you eat more or less whatever you want, and you’re good to go.

With proper dieting, you’re looking to lose 1 – 2 lbs of fat per week, you should never feel starved, and you should stay strong in the gym.

Focus on heavy, compound weightlifting.

The oft-repeated advice to focus on high-rep workouts to really “shred up” is idiotic.

Getting that coveted “shredded” look is only a matter of getting your body fat low enough. One style of lifting will not make you look “more shredded” than another.

As you may have already realized, to build muscle while losing fat, you simply want to do what works best for inducing muscle growth:

Focus on heavy (4-6 or 5-8 rep range), compound movements like the squat, deadlift, bench press, and military press, and train with a moderate workout volume (9-12 heavy sets per workout).

Some people might scoff at this advice and talk about the important of the “hypertrophy” rep range of 10-12, and I address this in my definitive guide to muscle growth, and in my book Bigger Leaner Stronger.

The big “secret” behind the high-rep, high-volume workouts espoused by many fitness models and bodybuilders is…drugs. It’s really that simple.

Working in the 12 – 15 rep range for 2 – 3 hours per day is GREAT if you’re chemically enhanced because your body can actually repair all that damage. It just can’t if you’re natural though.

Do HIIT cardio.

High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is really all you should be doing if you want to maximize muscle growth while losing fat.

Why?

For two primary reasons:

  • HIIT burns more fat per minute than steady-state cardio. 

This has been proven againagain, and again–it’s finally just an indisputable fact.

study conducted by The University of Western Ontario gives us insight into how much more effective it really is, as well. Researchers had 10 men and 10 women train 3 times per week, with one group doing 4-6 30-second treadmill sprints (with 4-6 minutes of rest in between each), and the other group doing 30-60 minutes of steady-state cardio (running on the treadmill at the “magical fat loss zone” of 65% VO2 max).

The results: After 6 weeks of training, the subjects doing the intervals had lost more fat. Yes, 4-6 30-second sprints burns more fat than 60 minutes of incline treadmill walking.

  • HIIT preserves more muscle than steady-state cardio.

Because of the hindered protein synthesis rates, preserving muscle is particularly important when you’re trying to build muscle while losing fat.

One of the ways HIIT does this relates to growth hormone production. Research has shown that HIIT spikes GH levels higher than steady-state cardio does, and growth hormone is a powerful muscle preserver.

Furthermore, research has shown that the longer your cardio sessions are, the more they impair strength and hypertrophy. That is, the shorter your cardio sessions are, the more muscle you preserve.

Thus, I recommend no more than 20-30 minutes of HIIT per session, and no more than 3-4 sessions per week. This cardio schedule will provide you with a large boost in fat loss while minimizing muscle loss.

Get enough sleep.

Not getting enough sleep hurts both aspects of your efforts to build muscle and lose fat.

Sleep needs vary from individual to individual, but according to the National Sleep Foundation, adults need 7–9 hours of sleep per night to avoid the negative effects of sleep deprivation.

Supplements to consider taking.

I saved this for last because it’s the least important, but it is worth mentioning.

I’ll keep it short and simple. Here are the supplement you should consider taking:

http://www.muscleforlife.com/build-muscle-lose-fat/


The Right Amounts

One of the single, most imperative principles in this plan is to eat the right amounts of macronutrients (protein, carbohydrates and fats). By manipulating these foods and staying strict with the guidelines your goals will soon be in range. Diet is so important that without adhering to these principles you will surely never reach your physique goals.

Protein: As the main source for building muscle, protein is absolutely necessary for your muscle-building strategy. Take in around 1 to 1.5 grams of protein per pound of bodyweight (this equates to 180-270 grams for a 180 pound individual). This will guarantee that your muscles will be getting the correct dose of amino acids for maintaining and building muscle tissue. Some prime sources are chicken, lean steak, fish, turkey, ground meat, eggs, cottage cheese, Greek yogurt and protein powders.

Carbohydrates: Carbohydrate is a great muscle-sparing energy source. This particular macronutrient will be drastically manipulated as the diet plan goes along and will play a major roll in its success so be extremely mindful of your intake on a daily basis. Be sure to have an intake mainly of complex carbohydrates and fiber. Sources include brown rice, wild rice, sweet potatoes, whole wheat bread, wheat pasta, vegetables, some fruits and Ezekiel products.

Fats: Never count out a healthy fat. Certain fats are essential regarding maintaining hormones such as testosterone, increasing fat burning and aiding energy levels. Healthy fats will be utilized to replace carbohydrate on certain days to keep blood sugar levels steady and help with satiety. Good sources include avocado, walnuts, almonds, olive oil, natural peanut butter, some egg yolks and sunflower seeds.

Light the Furnace!

Now let’s look at how we can implement these macronutrients and manipulate them in such a way as to build more strength and mass while torching our fat stores. Protein levels will stay somewhat the same throughout the plan. You need that steady stream of amino acids to feed to the muscles for recuperation and repair to take place. Try out one gram per pound of bodyweight and assess your progress. If you find yourself stalling, try to up it to 1.25 or 1.5 grams per pound and then reassess. That is about as high as you will want to go with protein – the rest is up to carbohydrate and fat manipulation. Give each change in protein amount about four weeks before reassessing.

Here is the tricky part. Now you will start to manipulate carbohydrate in such a way as to trick the body into delving into its fat stores for fuel. You will have high, medium and low consumption days. You will eat low carbs for two to four days followed by medium and high days. On the low days your body will burn fat for fuel and save muscle so as long as your protein intake is high enough. Before you starve your body of energy after so many days of low carbs (which if prolonged could lead to lower testosterone levels and metabolism) you will have a day of moderate carbs and another day of high carbs.

This will shuttle in fuel to the muscle, rev back up your metabolism and be burned without storing body fat. Carbohydrate intake will be approximately .5 grams per pound of bodyweight for low days (90 grams for a 180 pounder), 1.5 grams per pound on medium days (270 grams) and 2.25 grams per pound on high days (405 grams).

Fat intake should hover around .25 grams per pound of bodyweight or 20-30% of total calories. However, on low carbohydrate days it would be wise to increase your healthy fat intake slightly. This will ensure your hormone levels will stay steady and will supply you with ample energy for your grueling workouts. On the low carb days simply increase your fat intake by 50%. Remember that one gram of fat has over twice the amount of calories of carbs, so a little goes a long way. For example, if you had half of an avocado on a salad, now on low carb days you will eat 3/4 of an avocado.

http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/build-muscle-burn-fat-simultaneously.htm


Never Eat Carbs by Themselves

When attempting to lose bodyfat, insulin control is crucial. The total amount of insulin released by the body isn’t related to just how many carbohydrates you eat but how fast those carbs are digested. Refined carbs digest quickly, raising insulin levels substantially, which is why you should avoid them. But if you do happen to eat, say, a bowl of cold cereal (typically a fast-digesting carb), you can still take measures to ensure those carbs digest more slowly. This will cause less insulin to be released and therefore have less of an impact on your ability to burn fat.

Do This: One way to slow digestion is to eat carbs with protein and small amounts of fat. Never eat carbs alone. Accompany that bowl of cereal, for example, with scrambled egg whites or cottage cheese. Alternatively, you could eat plenty of vegetables, such as broccoli, cauliflower, green beans and green salads, with your meals. These foods actually slow the breakdown and digestion rate of all carbohydrates.

Never Eat Carbs Before Bed

Once again, it’s about hormones. At night your insulin sensitivity decreases, meaning your body must release more insulin than usual to put any carbohydrates you eat at night to use in the body. And by now you know that higher insulin levels can decrease fat-burning and enhance fat storage. In addition, the body naturally produces a fat-liberating hormone called growth hormone (GH) within the initial 90 minutes of sleep.

GH not only increases fat-burning but is required to build mass and strengthen the immune system. Yet carbs put a damper on GH release, so it’s ideal to go to bed under one of two scenarios: on an empty stomach or, even better, having consumed only protein, no carbs. This allows blood glucose – the high-tech name for digested carbs circulating in the blood – to remain low, which facilitates the rise in nocturnal GH production.

Do This: Don’t eat anything about three hours before bed. A better option is to eat only protein meals the final four hours before bed, with one protein meal immediately before bedtime that includes only protein, such as a casein shake, low-fat cottage cheese or chicken breast. You can, however, eat a small serving of vegetables here if you wish.

Use Nitric Oxide at Night

Nitric oxide (no) is the compound that opens everything up and, not surprisingly, it’s one of the best fat-burning products on the market. NO supports “the pump” when taken before training, enhancing blood flow to muscles by allowing more blood to make its way to tissues, including muscles, which can help maximize hypertrophy and boost metabolism. This arginine-based supplement is also effective when taken before bed, when it can exert a profound surge in GH levels and support fat-burning.

Do This: Within 30-60 minutes of bedtime every night, take a 5-10-gram dose of a nitric-oxide supplement that doesn’t contain caffeine on an empty stomach.

Leangains Workout Plan Overview

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The Leangains workout that I do is modified to my goals but this is very close to the recommendation. I workout Monday, Wednesday and Friday and rest all other days. I almost exclusively use barbells.

My goal is to put my body under maximum amounts of stress in short bursts then get the hell out of the gym. No burnouts, no screwing around. Some days I do 5 minutes of abs and/or more accessory work but I do it knowing that I am just having fun.

*Tip: I have noticed that I get most of my shoulder/back pulls and injuries during this “fun” time and rarely do it anymore.

I do 2 working sets:

I do a few warmup sets on each exercise before I move to the working sets. The goal of the warmup sets is to get my body ready to be put under a lot of stress. Below is an example, obviously you would adjust for your own warmups.

Example: Bench Press Warmup Sets

  • Warmup Set 1: Just the bar for 10 reps
    • This gets your joints moving and prepares your body to handle weight. This also helps me practice my form for the heavy sets
  • Warmup Set 2: 95lbs for 6 reps
    • Add a little weight and practice form – further preparing for heavier presses
  • Warmup Set 3: 135 for 3 reps
    • Here I have enough weight to feel it. To preserve my energy for the big presses I only do 2-3 reps.

After warming up I’ll take a 2-3 minute rest and then do 2 working sets.

Set 1: The maximum weight I can do for the desired rep range.

Set 2: Drop weight by approximately 10% – take 2-5 minutes rest. The goal of the second working set is to do (1) one more rep than I did in Set 1. So if I did 7 reps in Set 1 – I will do 8 reps in Set 2 and then stop.

Even if I can do more reps I stop. I never go to failure.

I was told this helps you progress and although I don’t know the science behind it I can tell you that I have almost always progressed in weight/reps – even during when I’m cutting and in a caloric deficit (which is not common).

My Exact Leangains Workout

Monday:

  • Deadlift 3-5x
  • Overhead Press 6-8x
  • Weighted Chin Ups 4-6x (I got this weighted dip belt on Amazon)
  • Barbell Rows 6-8x
  • 1 set of Weighted Close Grip Chin Ups 6-10x

Wednesday:

  • Bench Press 6-8x
  • Incline Dumbbell Press 6-8x
  • Barbell Curls 6-8x
  • Tricep Extensions 6-8x

Friday:

  • Squat 6-8x (I use these Rehband knee sleeves for knee protection)
  • Leg Curls 6-8x
  • Leg Extension 6-8x
  • Weighted Wide Dips 6-8x
  • Calves 12-16x
  • 1 set of Ab Rope Pulldowns 25x

Get Used to Working Out Less

At first it may be hard to convince yourself to workout less. (3) Three days a week and (2) two sets per exercise are much less than I was doing before. I struggled with it at first because it didn’t “feel” like I was doing enough.

The key is to get it done, do it right and then force yourself to get out of the gym. For me the results don’t lie.

http://www.malandarras.com/intermittent-fasting-and-leangains-transformation-with-photos

Leangains.com

Case Study: Malan Darras

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My workout split dropped from 6 days per week to 3. I stopped doing cardio and went on 30 minutes walks while listening to podcasts on the weekend instead.

Instead of screwing around in the gym fine-tuning a physique that didn’t exist yet.

  • I focused only on the major compound lifts. (Squats, deadlifts, bench press, barbell rows, overhead press)
  • I was in and out of the gym in 45 mins to 1 hour
  • I made a spreadsheet and added weight each week and got stronger and stronger.

I stopped food prepping and begin Intermittent Fasting. Meaning I ate all my food during an 8 hour window of time (12pm-8pm) and fasted for the rest of the day.

Intermittent Fasting opened my eyes to eating more types of foods  .

  • Ice cream sandwiches and bowls of ice cream
  • Frozen yogurt
  • Greek yogurt
  • Cottage cheese
  • Chipotle burritos
  • Waffles
  • Cheese
  • Whole Eggs

There were all foods I hadn’t eaten for years. I counted it all made it fit my macros and fit in my eating window. I did find keeping it to at least 80% whole foods and 20% fun foods was best for me. Most of the time more like 90/10.

After another 2 weeks of Intermittent Fasting and working out:

My stomach – (which is the hardest place for guys to lose fat) went concave. And for the first time ever I had popped out my chest and shoulders a little without a personal trainer.

My biceps got bigger and a huge vein popped out on each – which was odd because I stopped doing “arm days” completely, focusing instead on weighted chinups and two sets of heavy barbell curls for 5-6 reps, once per week.

My shoulders striated, my abs started carving out out and veins popped up everywhere. Each day I got tighter. No cheat days – none needed. Intermittent fasting seemed to solve that problem because I was eating fun foods regularly.

Example Workout Day Window:

  • 6:00am: Wake up, drink a lot of water and coffee
  • 8:30am: 10g BCAAs (branch chain amino acids)
  • 9:00am: Preworkout
  • 9:30am: Go to gym
  • 11:00am: 5g BCAAs
  • 12:00pm: Meal 1 (largest meal)
  • 4:00pm: Meal 2
  • 7:00pm: Meal 3

Example Rest Day Window:

  • 6:00am: Wake up, drink a lot of water and coffee
  • 9:30am: Drink Monster Zero Ultra
  • 10:00: 20-60 minute walk/hike with music or a podcast
  • 12:00pm: Meal 1 (largest meal)
  • 4:00pm: Meal 2
  • 7:00pm: Meal 3

Diet:

I eat a lot of protein every day. Most days I eat more than 1g of protein per pound of body weight, some days as much as 2g per lb.

I think the general recommendation is at least .08g of protein per pound. You might do some research on your own to see what the right amount is for your goal. I tend to error on the side of more.

These days I rarely use protein powders and instead get my protein from eating real, whole foods. I probably use 1 scoop of powder per day – normally in a protein pancake.

My Main Protein Sources:

  • Chicken breast
  • Egg Whites
  • Plain Greek Yogurt
  • Kashi Golean Original Cereal
  • Cottage Cheese

My Main Carb Sources:

  • Kashi Golean Original Cereal
  • Skinny Cow Ice Cream Sandwiches
  • Whole Grain Waffles
  • Whole Grain Bread
  • Low-Cal Ice Cream
  • Brown Rice

My Main Fat Sources:

  • Almonds
  • Natural Peanut Butter
  • Cheese
  • Whole eggs (with yolks)

Macronutrients (Macros) and Calorie Cycling

I eat differently depending on whether I workout or not. All days are high protein. Workout days are high carb/low fat. Rest days are high fat/low carb. I also cycle calories – even if I’m not cutting or bulking.

For example: If my goal is to stay my current weight, here’s what I’d do:

Workout days I’d eat approximately 300 calories over maintenance. Rest days I’d eat 300 calories under maintenance. At the end of the week my +/- net calories are still 0. I’m just eating more when I need it. Less when I don’t.

I have seen drastic physical changes doing this unlike anything I tried previously. It works amazingly well for me.

Workout Day Macros:

  • High protein
  • High Carbs
  • Low Fats

Rest Day Macros:

  • High protein
  • Low Carbs
  • High Fats

Example Intermittent Fasting Meal Plan (Workout Day)

Sample Workout Day of Eating (from MyFitnessPal.com)

Example Intermittent Fasting Meal Plan (Rest Day)

Sample Rest Day of Eating (from MyFitnessPal.com)

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